Answer 10

YES!
This is another case of Misrepresentation of Facts. In fact, this is a double whammy. If you deferred the exam by signing a Statutory Declaration, you have not violated only the Code of Student Behavior, but also the Canadian Criminal Code. The Statutory Declaration is a legally binding document, and lying on one could amount to a criminal charge of fraud, along with a charge under the Code of Student Behavior, with a possible F8 in the course and a suspension. Remember the famous story about 4 guys who deferred an exam by claiming that they had had a flat tire on the way to the exam: They were granted the deferral, and put into separate rooms to write the deferred exam. The test contained only one question: “Which tire?” BUSTED…. Check it out in the Code of Student Behavior, Sections 30.3.6(4) (Misrepresentation of Facts) and 30.3.6(2) (Breach of Rules External to the Code).

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Code of Student Behaviour Section 30.3.6(2)
30.3.6(2) a No Student shall engage in conduct that violates any municipal by-law, Provincial or Federal statute or regulation, or University regulation (Rules External to the Code). Conduct that breaches Rules External to the Code shall be deemed to be an offence under this Code and shall be subject to the disciplinary and appeal processes set out in this Code, if the conduct has a real and substantial link to the University, University Activities, the University Community, or University-related Functions, whether or not the conduct occurred on or in relation to University property.

30.3.6(2) b The determination of whether any conduct has such a real and substantial link may be made by any person or body authorized to make decisions in the disciplinary and appeal processes set out in this Code, and this determination may be appealed as part of an appeal provided for by this Code.

30.3.6(2) c The determination of whether a Student has breached Rules External to the Code may be made by any decision-maker under this Code, and this determination may be appealed as part of an appeal provided for by this Code.

30.3.6(2) d The determination referred to in 30.3.6(2) c shall be made in accordance with the rules of evidence and the burdens of proof specified in this Code. If, however, a person, court, tribunal, or other decision-making body with jurisdiction over an alleged Breach of Rules External to the Code has ruled that the Student did or did not commit a violation,

30.3.6(2) d. i evidence of that ruling, in any form satisfactory to the decision-maker, may be introduced as evidence that the Student did or did not (as the case may be) commit an offence for the purposes of this Code; and

30.3.6(2) d. ii the decision-maker shall accord such weight to the evidence of the ruling as the decision-maker considers appropriate in the circumstances.

30.3.6(2) e A Student who has been found to have committed an offence may receive a sanction under both the Code and Rules External to the Code.

30.3.6(4) No Student shall misrepresent pertinent facts to any member of the University community for the purpose of obtaining academic or other advantage. See also 30.3.2(2) b, c, d and e. [Cheating].